Sigrún Davíðsdóttir's Icelog

Investigation regarding Landsbanki in sight in Luxembourg

make a comment

By overturning an earlier court decision an appeal court in Luxembourg now seeks to establish an investigation into “money laundering, fraud and criminal conspiracy.” Benjamin Bodig, lawyer for the Landsbanki victim group, says it “opens the door to discover the truth and could lead to its victims being recognised as aggrieved customers” according to an article in Wort.

In October it will be six years since Landsbanki collapsed. The Luxembourg clients, mostly elderly foreign pensioners owning property in Spain and France, who had taken out equity release loans from Landsbanki have now for years sought to have investigated how Landsbanki handled these loans and the investment that were part of the loans and also the actions of the liquidator, Mme Hamilius.

Special prosecutor in Iceland has already charged Landsbanki managers for market manipulation and breach of fiduciary duty. These charges are still being dealt with by Icelandic courts. In France there is now an investigation into the Landsbanki practices as well. From what I have seen regarding Landsbanki operations in Luxembourg there is good reason to investigate the bank’s operation, both before and after the collapse.

The actions against Landsbanki in France and Luxembourg would not have happened if it were not for the heroic attempts by the Landsbanki victim group to have these operations investigated. Their attempts in Luxembourg were met by remarkable lack of interest on behalf of the authorities, the height of which was when Robert Biever Procureur Général d’Etat, state prosecutor, sided openly with the liquidator, echoing her view that the Landsbanki Luxembourg clients raising concerns just did not want to repay their loans, as mentioned in an earlier Icelog.

As I have written earlier this “case has shown that when it comes to unified European financial  sector it only works for banks, facilitating cross-border operations. For clients and consumer protection this sector has as many holes as a Swiss cheese. A food for thought: if cross-border operations only work for banks and not for clients they should not be allowed.

Here are some earlier Icelogs on the remarkable story of this case that authorities in Luxembourg have ignored for so long.

Follow me on Twitter for running updates.

Written by Sigrún Davídsdóttir

July 17th, 2014 at 9:51 am

Posted in Iceland

Leave a Reply